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The Theft of Memory: Losing My Father, One Day at a Time
The Theft of Memory: Losing My Father, One Day at a Time | Jonathan Kozol
4 posts | 1 read | 1 to read
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SqueakyChu
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This is *so* true.

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SqueakyChu
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This line was very moving. It reminded me of when my husband and I were younger, and we used to take our children fishing. We haven‘t done so in quite a few years, but now our younger son takes his own children fishing. We are presently that “older generation” of which the author writes, although his dad in this book was very much older than we are now. And yet...those are much beloved memories of special times together.

Anna40 I started taking my son fishing last year! I had never been and the library had organized and event for children. You could borrow a fishing rod. We then learned how to do it and how to release the fish when we visited my sister and her partner in Michigan. He‘s a master fisherman :) so, i can only understand that those are truly wonderful memories :) 13mo
SqueakyChu Yes! Fishing memories are the best. My husband used to fish with our younger son who now has taught his own eight-year-old son to be quite the fisherman! 🐟 💕 I love to go fishing, but haven‘t been in quite a while. 13mo
12 likes2 comments
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SqueakyChu
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Medical practice has changed over the years, but not always for the better. I told my younger son tonight that my own dad did want want to move out of the city in which he lived because he did not want to leave his physician. That was the doctor-patient relationship of former days. It‘s all but gone now. Our family doctor belonged to us from as far back as I can remember until I received the phone call from him that my dad had just died.

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SqueakyChu
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This is a beautiful book. It‘s like an ode to a beloved person who is living inside a stranger. The author and son, Jonathan Kozol, visits his father, who suffers from Alzheimer‘s disease, in a care facility. The son carefully records his interactions with his dad— noting both the deterioration in his father‘s thinking process, and also the sudden bright spots of memory that deeply endear him to his dad. #LibraryThing #EarlyReviewer

Itchyfeetreader Wow this sounds like a tough and moving read 13mo
SqueakyChu @Itchyfeetreader It is. Particularly because friends of mine have been or are now struggling with parents dealing with this same issue. This is actually why I chose this book to read now. It had been a #LibraryThing #EarlyReviewer in 2015, at which time I started it, but never finished it. 13mo
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