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#BLR2019
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CrowCAH
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#BigLibraryRead #BLR2019

Question 4: how is Pops, Lena‘s grandfather, a sting father figure? Why is he so strict with Lena? Explain how Marcus and others in the neighborhood work with Pops to keep Lena safe. How does she rebel; what‘s at the root of it?

megnews I think Pop‘s is strict because of the neighborhood. He‘s probably seen kids succumb to it. The neighbors check on Lena, ask questions, threaten to call her Pops to try to keep her in line. She rebels with the older boyfriend. She‘s trying to make her own choices and test the boundaries like most teenagers do. (edited) 6d
ElizaMarie Pops is a central father figure for not only Lena but it appears that he is the father of many of the kids in the neighborhood. I feel like because he is a “good man“ he is trying to make sure his “children“ do not gets sucked into the lifestyles that so many people without role models do. I think he is strict with Lena because he can see the potential. She is strong willed, but also very kind. This can lead her down the wrong path (with the boy) 4d
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ElizaMarie Lena rebeling I think is nothing more than teenager attitude. Teens think they are invincible and feel like their elders “don't understand“ the way the world is for them. She loves that boyfriend and sees the good in him whereas her family doesn't. I mean we have all been there, thinking we know more than people who have “been there“. Some mistakes we need to learn on our own. 4d
CrowCAH @megnews true, teenage years are the years of discovery. 2d
CrowCAH @ElizaMarie he sounds like a wise man. 2d
44 likes6 comments
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CrowCAH
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#BigLibraryRead #BLR2019

Question 3: Why is Campbell‘s father eager for her to work the concession stand at the football game? What does this say about their relationship and about Campbell‘s resentment about leaving her old school? She often experiences loneliness; is there hope at the end for a different life?

(Sorry posting this late today)

ElizaMarie I didn't really get that it was a good/bad thing that her dad wanted her to work concession. I mean maybe it was his attempt to get her to embrace the new school (like a way to have ownership in the area?) Or maybe teaching her about hard work? 1w
marleed @ElizaMarie Yeah, I don‘t have mycopy of the book anymore and thought - oh interesting I don‘t have a clue - that wasn‘t a moment I took from the book. I was thinking she volunteered because she was needed in a new situation and knew how to do it from previous experience. ...It is interesting - the things we take away from a story to retain the significance of it. 1w
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megnews This came across pretty straightforward to me. A parent trying to make sure his daughter gets involved in school activities to make friends. If he knew she did this when she lives with her mom, it‘s probably why he picked this particular thing. 1w
CrowCAH @ElizaMarie all plausible thoughts! 1w
CrowCAH @marleed I agree, different aspects of a book stand out to each person. 1w
CrowCAH @megnews it‘s also a low keyed way to meet people. 1w
ElizaMarie @megnews True. I think father felt as if his daughter made friends she might not feel so miserable about starting a new school? 1w
CogsOfEncouragement This did stand out to me because I was irritated with him. I do not think it was for Campbell‘s benefit. The father wanted to go fishing. That was his habit. He wanted to keep that habit. He wanted to feel less guilty about it. He left Campbell with five bucks and a flimsy way to get home. Irritating even if nothing had occurred to set off a riot. (edited) 3d
CrowCAH @ElizaMarie a solid recommendation. 2d
CrowCAH @CogsOfEncouragement we‘re all selfish and don‘t like our routines to be interrupted. 2d
36 likes11 comments
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CrowCAH
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#BigLibraryRead #BLR2019

Question 2: how do Lena and Campbell have false views of the other? Why does Lena assume Campbell is rich? How does Campbell coming from a Pennsylvania school with few black students contribute to her ignorance about people of color?

ElizaMarie So I‘m still working on this one but... I assume she believed she was rich because she is a white girl. I grew up in a mostly Hispanic area where because I have a “white” last name.. people assumed I was a higher class 1w
marleed Misconceptions! Just tonight I was at a wedding reception and talking about an event with my son.... We sponsored a college student from Tokyo when my son was 3-7 yrs old. In 3rd grade he came home so confused because a new boy from Japan was in his class. He had blonde hair. A few weeks later this boy came for a play date - his parents had been stationed in Japan for 3 years! 1w
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CrowCAH @ElizaMarie that‘s interesting. Lots of factors go into first impressions, many of which can be incorrect. 1w
CrowCAH @marleed ah I see. Just because he was “from” Japan, doesn‘t mean he is Japanese. Good example. 1w
megnews I attended a pretty diverse high school. These types of stereotypes were tossed around a lot. If you grow up in a neighborhood you rarely leave to realize the vast differences between people despite their race and you do not have friends with a variety of backgrounds, it‘s fairly easy to ascribe to these beliefs. 1w
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CrowCAH
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#BigLibraryRead #BLR2019

Question 1: discuss the structure of the novel, thoughts on the five parts, the two point of views, keeping in mind the whole novel takes place in one night.

megnews I always enjoy novels written from multiple points of view and this was no exception. I think it was especially important to tell this story well. 1w
marleed I too thought the two perspectives were were very meaningful for a book so valuable to YA discussion. Understanding how everyone has their own history which forces them to receive information uniquely, particularly in moments of trauma, is important. 1w
CrowCAH @marleed I agree, we all have our own histories that we filter information through. 1w
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ElizaMarie I really enjoyed that we got to see both girls perspective of the exact same scene. It helps the reader see how different these girls are but also helps us see some of the similarities they have. I ended up listening to this on Audio which I think adds a special factor to it as well. We hear it more “in their own words“ 4d
CogsOfEncouragement I always enjoy books that give us multiple first person POV. Actions only mean so much, being allowed to understand motive tells so much more about the character. Being able to hear a character‘s thought about something she understands clearly, or completely misunderstands is also revealing. 3d
CrowCAH @ElizaMarie I enjoy listening to audiobooks; helps the workday go by fast. 2d
CrowCAH @CogsOfEncouragement so true, the emotions are what makes the story memorable! 2d
41 likes7 comments
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CrowCAH
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#BigLibraryRead #BLR2019

The Big Library Read has started: November 4th through 18.

Snag your BLR on OverDrive via your library card!

In a couple days I‘ll post discussion questions for any who are reading the book.

CogsOfEncouragement I‘m starting this tonight. 2w
marleed I started today! 2w
CrowCAH @CogsOfEncouragement @marleed the first question is posted; can‘t wait to see your thoughts. 1w
48 likes3 comments
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CrowCAH
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#BigLibraryRead #BLR2019

June 17 - July 1

Check out the book via OverDrive, unlimited copies.

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CrowCAH
Homes: A Refugee Story | Abu Bakr al Rabeeah, Winnie Yeung
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#BigLibraryRead #BLR2019

Thank you to all who participated in this month‘s Big Library Read!

See ya next time for another selection worthy of discussion.

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CrowCAH
Homes: A Refugee Story | Abu Bakr al Rabeeah, Winnie Yeung
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#BigLibraryRead #BLR2019

Question 10: while this is Abu Bakr‘s story, written from his point of view, it is authored by Winnie Yeung. What responsibilities does Winnie have, as an author of creative non-fiction, to honor Bakr‘s voice?

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CrowCAH
Homes: A Refugee Story | Abu Bakr al Rabeeah, Winnie Yeung
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#BigLibraryRead #BLR2019

Question 9: one of the main reasons this book was written was to build empathy. What parts of Abu Bakr‘s journey connects to a life story of your own?

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CogsOfEncouragement
Homes: A Refugee Story | Abu Bakr al Rabeeah, Winnie Yeung
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Pickpick

This is the current #BigLibraryRead. I‘m glad I got news of it in time to enjoy it. Eye-opening, and thought provoking story of a loving family able to survive and finally leave the place of a hateful war. #BLR #LibraryEBook

CrowCAH Woohoo! Join the conversation; I‘ve been posting discussion questions during the #BLR2019 period! 7mo
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