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The Field of the Cloth of Gold
The Field of the Cloth of Gold | Magnus Mills
3 posts | 2 read | 4 to read
The Great Field lies in the bend of a broad, meandering river. Bounded on three sides by water, on the fourth side it dwindles gradually into wilderness. A handful of tents are scattered far and wide across its immensity. Their flags flutter in the warm breeze, rich with the promise of halcyon days. But more and more people are setting up camp in the lush pastures, and with each new arrival, life becomes a little more complicated. And when a large and disciplined group arrives from across the river, emotions run so high that even a surplus of milk pudding can't soothe ruffled feathers. Change is coming; change that threatens the delicate balance of power in the Great Field. Magnus Mills's new novel takes its name from the site of a 1520 meeting between Henry VIII and Francis I of France, to improve relations between the countries as the Treaty of London deteriorated. It allegorically suggests a number of historical encounters on British soil: the coming of the Vikings, the coming of the Romans. But The Field of the Cloth of Gold sits firmly outside of time, a skillful and surreal fable dealing with ideas of ownership, empire, immigration, charisma, diplomacy, and bureaucracy. It cements Magnus Mills's status as one of the most original and beloved novelists writing today.
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TheEllieMo
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Fantasy is not a genre I‘ve ever been particularly drawn to, so this is the closest I get to a #FantasySetting. In short, this is kind of the history of Britain in the first millennium AD, condensed into a few months and set in a makeshift campsite. I‘m not doing it justice - it‘s a brilliantly quirky little novel.

#MarchMadness @Eggs

Eggs Well done 👍🏼👏🏻🤗 3y
27 likes1 comment
review
SandDune
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Pickpick

This one was a little strange. An allegory of a slice of British history told through the story of various settlers in tents on a very large field ... I‘m not 100% sure what it was all about, but I did enjoy it.

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Joriebooks
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Starting this book this Sunday morning. It‘s fairly short- only 200 pages. I wanted something to offset my other read, which is over 700 pages.
#sundayfunday

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