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Georges
Georges | Alexandre Dumas
4 posts | 4 read | 5 to read
A swashbuckling adventure by the author of The Three Musketeers chronicles the story of Georges Munier, a wealthy, young mulatto on the Caribbean island of Mauritius, who returns from his European education, falls in love with a beautiful white woman whose race-conscious family objects to the match, and leads a slave uprising. Reprint. 10,000 first printing.
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review
vlwelser
Georges | Alexandre Dumas
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Mehso-so

This is a typical Dumas. Lots of action. Plenty of ridiculousness. This one honestly wasn't as exciting as some others. And there's a lot less death and gore than normal. Actually, the only notable thing about it is that its theme is racism and it's the only book he wrote about it despite the fact that he probably experienced quite a lot in his own life. Also, this may be the first book I've read set in Mauritius.

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28 likes1 comment
quote
vlwelser
Georges | Alexandre Dumas
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It may be really nerdy but this book description annoyed me. I mean, if you don't know where Mauritius is shouldn't you look it up before you include it in the book description? I have no idea what edition this is from. I'm currently reading some generic French edition that spit out of Amazon for free.

Am I being too judgemental?

review
frumious
Georges | Alexandre Dumas
Mehso-so

For every pinpoint sharp thing Dumas says about race I guarantee there is a cringingly bad comment about Asians or the simple mindedness of common black people to set it back. Dumas clearly had some shit to work through, and the book reflects the complication of its creator, both speaking against racism and also displaying a large amount of it, internalized or not. I wish I could hate it, but I don't. I wish I could love it, but I can't.

quote
frumious
Georges | Alexandre Dumas

In any event, Henri needed no further education; he already knew the most important thing: Colored men, ALL colored men, were born to respect him, and to obey.