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Elastic
Elastic: Flexible Thinking in a Time of Change | Leonard Mlodinow
2 posts | 2 read | 1 to read
From the best-selling author of Subliminal and The Drunkards Walk comes a groundbreaking look at the psychology and neuroscience of change, and at how tapping into elastic thinking will help us thrive in the modern world. Drawing on cutting-edge research, Leonard Mlodinow takes us on an illuminating journey through the mechanics of our minds as we navigate the rapidly changing landscapes around us. Out of the exploratory instincts that allowed our ancestors to prosper hundreds of thousands of years ago, humans developed a cognitive style that Mlodinow terms elastic thinking, a unique set of talents that include neophilia (an affinity for novelty), schizotypy (a tendency toward unusual perception), imagination and idea generation, and divergent and integrative thinking. These are the qualities that enabled innovators from MaryShelley to Miles Davis, from the inventor of jumbo-sized popcorn to the creators of Pokmon Go, to effect paradigm shifts in our culture and society. In our age of unprecedented technological innovation and social change, it is more important than ever to encourage these abilities and traits. How can we train our brains to be more comfortable when confronting change and more adept at innovation? How do our brains generate new ideas, and how can we nurture that process? Why can diversity and even discord be beneficial to our thought process? With his keen acumen and quick wit, Leonard Mlodinow gives us the essential tools to harness the power of elastic thinking in an endlessly dynamic world.
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charliemarlowe
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My current #audiobook listen— I decided I needed to give the more science-ish books a little break. I‘m enjoying this one well enough, I guess, but it‘s not exactly holding me in as much as Carlo Rovelli or Steve Brusatte did.

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Gina
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Mehso-so

I love the idea of flexible thinking but unfortunately this book was only so-so. The author uses a lot of comparison to human thinking such as with insects and animals which I found confusing. He also used clinical studies which again seemed convoluted as he didn't tie the concept of the book to all this information in a clear way. It did however have a few interesting tid bits that held me till the end.