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The Consolations of Philosophy
The Consolations of Philosophy | Alain de Botton
6 posts | 23 read | 9 to read
From the author of How Proust Can Change Your Life, a delightful, truly consoling work that proves that philosophy can be a supreme source of help for our most painful everyday problems. Perhaps only Alain de Botton could uncover practical wisdom in the writings of some of the greatest thinkers of all time. But uncover he does, and the result is an unexpected book of both solace and humor. Dividing his work into six sections -- each highlighting a different psychic ailment and the appropriate philosopher -- de Botton offers consolation for unpopularity from Socrates, for not having enough money from Epicurus, for frustration from Seneca, for inadequacy from Montaigne, and for a broken heart from Schopenhauer (the darkest of thinkers and yet, paradoxically, the most cheering). Consolation for envy -- and, of course, the final word on consolation -- comes from Nietzsche: "Not everything which makes us feel better is good for us." This wonderfully engaging book will, however, make us feel better in a good way, with equal measures of wit and wisdom.
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loiserin
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Finding it hard to make myself read recently but a friend of mine bought this as a gift for starting my masters degree on Monday and it's really good! I was mostly attracted to it because of the cover but de Botton also manages to have a pleasant conversational tone that I have seen pulled off with this much success before. Definitely recommend! Maybe it's time to take a break from fiction for a bit.

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DavidThePavid
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Excellent book, summaries and pratical tips from many major philpsophies

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amanda.meadows.1989
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Finished this last night...so many 'yes!' moments

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Jamesfahyauthor
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written in AD 523 during a one-year imprisonment Boethius served while awaiting trial – and eventual execution – for the alleged crime of treason Boethius was at the very heights of power in Rome and was brought down by treachery. This experience inspired the text, which reflects on how evil can exist in a world governed by God (the problem of theodicy), and how happiness is still attainable amidst fickle fortune.

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midhuns
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ComradeMao
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2016, Book 36 "All lives are difficult; what makes them fulfilled as well is the manner in which pains have been met. Every pain is an indistinct signal that something is wrong, which may engender either a good or bad result, depending on the sagacity and the strength of the mind of the sufferer. As Nietzsche's beloved Montaigne had explained in the final chapters of the Essays, the art of living lies in finding uses for our adversities."

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